Video: Kid gets trapped in an Elevator after peeing on the control buttons

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A hilarious video has gone viral today showing a rebellious Chinese kid taking a piss on an elevator aiming his urine at the control buttons so that the next person who uses the lift will have smelly hands. Well, Karma decided to pay him back and the elevator broke.

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

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The earliest known reference to an elevator is in the works of the Roman architect Vitruvius, who reported that Archimedes (c. 287 BC – c. 212 BC) built his first elevator probably in 236 BC.[9] Some sources from later historical periods mention elevators as cabs on a hemp rope powered by hand or by animals. In 1000, the Book of Secrets by al-Muradi in Islamic Spain described the use of an elevator-like lifting device, in order to raise a large battering ram to destroy a fortress.[10] In the 17th century the prototypes of elevators were located in the palace buildings of England and France. Louis XV of France had a so-called ‘flying chair’ built for one of his mistresses at the Chateau de Versailles in 1743.

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Ancient and medieval elevators used drive systems based on hoists or windlasses. The invention of a system based on the screw drive was perhaps the most important step in elevator technology since ancient times, leading to the creation of modern passenger elevators. The first screw drive elevator was built by Ivan Kulibin and installed in Winter Palace in 1793. Several years later another of Kulibin’s elevators was installed in Arkhangelskoye near Moscow.The development of elevators was led by the need for movement of raw materials including coal and lumber from hillsides. The technology developed by these industries and the introduction of steel beam construction worked together to provide the passenger and freight elevators in use today. Starting in the coal mines, by the mid-19th century elevators were operated with steam power and were used for moving goods in bulk in mines and factories. These steam driven devices were soon being applied to a diverse set of purposes – in 1823, two architects working in London, Burton and Hormer, built and operated a novel tourist attraction, which they called the “ascending room”. It elevated paying customers to a considerable height in the center of London, allowing them a magnificent panoramic view of downtown.

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Early, crude steam-driven elevators were refined in the ensuing decade; – in 1835, an innovative elevator called the “Teagle” was developed by the company Frost and Stutt in England. The elevator was belt-driven and used a counterweight for extra power. The hydraulic crane was invented by Sir William Armstrong in 1846, primarily for use at the Tyneside docks for loading cargo. These quickly supplanted the earlier steam driven elevators: exploiting Pascal’s law, they provided a much greater force. A water pump supplied a variable level of water pressure to a plunger encased inside a vertical cylinder, allowing the level of the platform (carrying a heavy load) to be raised and lowered. Counterweights and balances were also used to increase the lifting power of the apparatus.

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