“Sympathy For Mr. Vengeance” They Jumped His Little Brother.

    

The man in the video with his shirt off was at home playing call of duty video game when his little brother returned home from school bloodied and beat down. His little brother told him he got jumped and named his attackers. So the big brother did what big brothers are supposed to do, get revenge.

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

   

Revenge is a form of justice enacted in the absence of the norms of formal law and jurisprudence. Often, revenge is defined as being a harmful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived. It is used to punish a wrong by going outside the law. Francis Bacon described revenge as a kind of “wild justice” that “does… offend the law [and] putteth the law out of office”.[1] Primitive justice or retributive justice is often differentiated from more formal and refined forms of justice such as distributive justice and divine judgment.

   

Social psychologist Ian Mckee states that the desire for the sustenance of power motivates vengeful behavior as a means of impression management: “People who are more vengeful tend to be those who are motivated by power, by authority and by the desire for status. They don’t want to lose face”. Some societies encourage vengeful behavior, which is called feud. These societies usually regard the honor of individuals and groups as of central importance. Thus, while protecting of his reputation an avenger feels as if he restores the previous state of dignity and justice.

According to Michael Ignatieff, “revenge is a profound moral desire to keep faith with the dead, to honor their memory by taking up their cause where they left off”.[5] Thus, honor may become a heritage that passes from generation to generation. Whenever it is compromised, the affected family or community members might feel compelled to retaliate against an offender to restore the initial “balance of honor” that preceded the perceived injury. This cycle of honor might expand by bringing the family members and then the entire community of the new victim into the brand-new cycle of revenge that may pervade generations.

Feuds are cycles of provocation and retaliation, fueled by a burning desire for revenge and carried out over long periods of time by familial or tribal groups; they were an important part of many pre-industrial societies, especially in the Mediterranean region. They still persist in some areas, notably in Albania with its tradition of gjakmarrja or “blood feuds”. During the Middle Ages, most would not regard an insult or injury as settled until it was avenged, or, at the least, paid for—hence, the extensive Anglo-Saxon system of weregild (literally, “man-price”) payments, which placed a certain monetary value upon certain acts of violence in an attempt to limit the spiral of revenge by codifying the responsibility of a malefactor. Blood feuds are still practiced in many parts of the world, including Kurdish regions of Turkey and in Papua New Guinea.