No Chill: Drunk Girls Vs. A Group Of Gay Dudes In A West Hollywood Alley

      

West Hollywood is known in Los Angeles, California as “Gay Land” because it’s the neighborhood that the gay community has decided to populate. In this video a group of drunk girls hanging out in West Hollywood get into it with a couple of proud gay men and things go terribly wrong. Check it out.

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Alcohol intoxication, also known as drunkenness among other names, is a physiological condition that may result in psychological alterations of consciousness. Symptoms of alcohol intoxication include euphoria, flushed skin, and decreased social inhibition at lower doses,[1] with larger doses producing progressively severe impairments of balance, and decision-making ability as well as nausea or vomiting from alcohol’s disruptive effect on the semicircular canals of the inner ear and chemical irritation of the gastric mucosa.

Extreme levels of blood-borne alcohol may result in coma or death. Alcohol intoxication is the result of drinking alcohol such that it enters the bloodstream faster than it can be metabolized by the body. Metabolism results in breaking down the ethanol into non-intoxicating byproducts. Some effects of alcohol intoxication, such as euphoria and lowered social inhibition, are central to alcohol’s desirability as a beverage.[citation needed] Throughout history it has been one of the world’s most widespread recreational drugs.

Despite this widespread use and alcohol’s legality in most countries, many medical sources tend to describe any level of alcohol intoxication as a form of poisoning due to ethanol’s damaging effects on the body in large doses. Some religions consider alcohol intoxication to be a sin. Acute alcohol poisoning is a related medical term used to indicate a dangerously high concentration of alcohol in the blood, high enough to induce coma, respiratory depression, or even death. It is considered a medical emergency.

The term is mostly used by healthcare providers. Toxicologists use the term “alcohol intoxication” to discriminate between alcohol and other toxins. Alcohol is metabolized by a normal liver at the rate of about 8 grams of pure ethanol per hour. 8 grams or 10 ml (0.34 US fl oz) is one British standard unit. An “abnormal” liver with conditions such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, gall bladder disease, and cancer is likely to result in a slower rate of metabolism. Ethanol is metabolised to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is found in many tissues, including the gastric mucosa.

Acetaldehyde is metabolised to acetate by acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which is found predominantly in liver mitochondria. Acetate is used by the muscle cells to produce acetyl-CoA using the enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase, and the acetyl-CoA is then used in the citric acid cycle. Ethanol’s acute effects are due largely to its nature as a central nervous system depressant, and are dependent on blood alcohol concentrations: As drinking increases, people become sleepy, or fall into a stupor.

  

After a very high level of consumption, the respiratory system becomes depressed and the person will stop breathing. Comatose patients may aspirate their vomit (resulting in vomitus in the lungs, which may cause “drowning” and later pneumonia if survived). CNS depression and impaired motor co-ordination along with poor judgment increases the likelihood of accidental injury occurring.[8] It is estimated that about one-third of alcohol-related deaths are due to accidents and another 14% are from intentional injury.