MMA Fighter Steps In The Ring With Roy Jones Jr. & It Goes Terribly Wrong

    

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Roy Jones Jr. returned to the ring on Saturday night to face Vyron Phillips, a 33yr old MMA fighter with no professional boxing experience. Phillips won the lottery to face Jones Jr. over 1,500 entries. Phillips would have won $100,000 if he were to beat Jones Jr.

   

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

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Roy Levesta Jones Jr. (born January 16, 1969) is an American former professional boxer, boxing commentator, boxing trainer, rapper, and actor who holds dual American and Russian citizenship.[1] He competed in boxing from 1989 to 2018, and is a six-time world champion in four weight classes, having held titles at middleweight, super middleweight, light heavyweight, and heavyweight; and is the only boxer in history to start his professional career at light middleweight and go on to win a heavyweight title. As an amateur he represented the United States at the 1988 Summer Olympics, winning a silver medal in the light middleweight division.

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Jones is considered by many to be one of the best boxers of all time, pound for pound, and left his mark in the sport’s history when he won the WBA heavyweight title in 2003, becoming the first former middleweight champion to win a heavyweight title in 106 years. Prior to that, in 1999, he became the undisputed light heavyweight champion by unifying the WBA, WBC, and IBF titles. During his prime, Jones was known for possessing exceptional hand speed, athleticism, movement and reflexes.

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As of February 2018, Jones holds the record for the most wins in unified light heavyweight title bouts in boxing history, at twelve. The Ring magazine named Jones the Fighter of the Year in 1994, and the World Boxing Hall of Fame named him the Fighter of the Year for 2003. He is also a three-time winner of the Best Boxer ESPY Award (1996, 2000, and 2003). The Boxing Writers Association of America named him as the Fighter of the Decade for the 1990s.

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Jones won the 1984 United States National Junior Olympics in the 119 lb (54 kg) weight division, the 1986 United States National Golden Gloves in the 139 lb (63 kg) division, and the 1987 United States National Golden Gloves in the 156 lb (71 kg) division. As an amateur, he ended his career with a 121–13 record. Jones represented the United States at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games, where he won the silver medal.[2] He dominated his opponents, never losing a single round en route to the final. His participation in the final was met with controversy when he lost a 3–2 decision to South Korean fighter Park Si-Hun despite pummeling Park for three rounds.

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landing 86 punches to Park’s 32.[2] Allegedly, Park himself apologized to Jones afterward and the referee told Jones that he was dumbstruck by the judges’ decision.[3] One judge shortly thereafter admitted the decision was a mistake and all three judges voting against Jones were eventually suspended. Marv Albert, calling the bout on American television for NBC, reported judges from Hungary and the Soviet Union scored the bout in favor of Jones, while those from Morocco and Uruguay favored Park. The fifth judge, from Uganda, scored the bout as a draw, leaving the outcome to be decided on other criteria.

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